Mark Salling, Glee actor, Dead At 35 From Apparent Suicide.

(CNN) — Actor Mark Salling, best known for his role as Noah “Puck” Puckerman on Fox’s musical comedy-drama “Glee,” has died, according to his attorney. He was 35.

“I can confirm that Mark Salling passed away early this morning,” attorney Michael Proctor said in a statement to CNN. “Mark was a gentle and loving person, a person of great creativity, who was doing his best to atone for some serious mistakes and errors of judgment.”

Los Angeles Police tell CNN they were called to investigate a report of a death in a wooded area near Tujunga at 8:50 am local time on Tuesday morning but could not confirm any further information.

Salling was indicted in May 2016 on charges of receiving and possessing child pornography.

He pleaded guilty to one count of possession of child pornography involving a prepubescent minor and was scheduled for sentencing March 7.

As part of a plea agreement, Salling was expected to be sentenced to four years to seven years in federal prison, followed by a 20-year period of supervised release and registration as a sex offender.

‘Glee’ years

“Glee,” created by Ryan Murphy, ran on Fox from 2009-15.

Salling came into the show with few other television or film credits to his name. The overnight success of the high school-set musical series turned much of the original cast into overnight sensations.

The original cast included Lea Michele, Chris Colfer, and Cory Monteith.

Montieth died of an overdose in 2013.

Salling was a regular on “Glee” for the first four seasons. He was a recurring cast member during the last two seasons, as characters began to age out of storylines.

“It’s a painful loss, again,” director Paris Barclay, who worked on “Glee,” wrote on Twitter, accompanied by a picture of himself with Monteith and Salling. “Two young actors, lost too soon. RIP #marksalling.”

Salling is survived by his mother and father, and his brother.

“The Salling family appreciates the support they have been receiving and asks for their privacy to be respected,” Proctor added.

CNN’s Lisa France contributed to this report.

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We Can All Prevent Suicide

Know the Risk Factors

Risk factors are characteristics that make it more likely that someone will consider, attempt, or die by suicide. They can’t cause or predict a suicide attempt, but they’re important to be aware of.

  • Mental disorders, particularly mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and certain personality disorders
  • Alcohol and other substance use disorders
  • Hopelessness
  • Impulsive and/or aggressive tendencies
  • History of trauma or abuse
  • Major physical illnesses
  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • Family history of suicide
  • Job or financial loss
  • Loss of relationship(s)
  • Easy access to lethal means
  • Local clusters of suicide
  • Lack of social support and sense of isolation
  • Stigma associated with asking for help
  • Lack of healthcare, especially mental health and substance abuse treatment
  • Cultural and religious beliefs, such as the belief that suicide is a noble resolution of a personal dilemma
  • Exposure to others who have died by suicide (in real life or via the media and Internet)

Know the Warning Signs

Some warning signs may help you determine if a loved one is at risk for suicide, especially if the behavior is new, has increased, or seems related to a painful event, loss, or change. If you or someone you know exhibits any of these, seek help by calling the Lifeline.

  • Talking about wanting to die or to kill themselves
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, like searching online or buying a gun
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live
  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
  • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or isolating themselves
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Extreme mood swings

To learn more visit the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline website: www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org 

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